Posts for the code principles Category

SOLID Principles with Python Code Examples

SOLID Principles – If you are a professional developer, there’s no way around these rules for object-oriented software design.

Yannic Schröer

· 10 min read

GRASP - General Responsibility Assignment Software Principles

GRASP is an acronym for General Responsibility Assignment Software Principles. In this article, we want to point out these principles and how they work.

Yannic Schröer

· 8 min read

Meaningful Names

Every developer heard this sentence at least once before: “Use meaningful names for your variables!”. As I heard this advice for the first time, I thought: Nothing easier than that! I know the purpose of my variables, accordingly, it shouldn’t be a problem to give them good names. However, after months I read my code again and didn't understand anything. This post will present a few tips and best practices for writing better names!

Jonas Scholl

· 4 min read

Comments - What you should keep in mind

Comments are one of the first features everybody gets to know when learning a new programming language. They can be useful for describing the functionality of code-segments or giving additional information about some code. There are many good reasons to use comments. However, you should still keep a few things in mind when you write them!

Jonas Scholl

· 6 min read

Do one thing - Not the single responsibility principle (SRP)

The “Do one thing” rule for programming is essential to everyone’s clean code philosophy. Learn why and how to apply it.

Yannic Schröer

· 4 min read

KISS Principle (Keep it simple stupid)

KISS - an acronym for “keep it simple stupid” is a design rule that every professional developer should apply to their code. It reduces complexity and improves readability as well as maintainability by aiming for the simplest solution.

Yannic Schröer

· 4 min read

DRY Principle

Do you tend to repeat code over and over again? There are several important reasons besides DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) not to do so.

Yannic Schröer

· 2 min read